Tag Archives: JICA

Nigeria National water master plan captures development up to 2030

The Deputy Manager of the Master Plan Project seems to be assuming two important data – Nigeria’s population growth rate and water demand. While his sweeping statement about these two, sounds pleasing to the ear, one may ask if the Ministry of Water Resources has any fairly reliable information about Nigeria’s population growth rate and water demand.

Our population figures have always been flawed. When the Chairman, National Population Commission, Chief Festus Odimegwu felt uncomfortable about the reliability of the census figures, he resigned his appointment in 2013. Oduimegu was quoted in the Punch Newspaper of October 2013 as saying “During the 2006 census, workers locked out the commissioners over the creation of new areas. When the NPC did its own census in 2006 and said Lagos State was 9 million, Bola Ahmed Tinubu, who was the governor then came out and declared that the population of Lagos was 17 million.

“Nigeria has run on falsehood for too long. We must stop this falsehood and put a stop to all of these. The Boko Haram problem is partly as a result of that. Because the 2006 census wasn’t correct, the former board of the NPC was unable to publish the figures.

“If they try it, there will be an uproar. We must make Nigeria work. We can’t do that unless we know the statistics. We can’t build infrastructure without demographic data. As long as the figures in Nigeria are wrong, corruption will continue to thrive. We must have an organised data before we can plan for Nigeria.”

With respect to having to consult the master plan for how much water is available, one will like to ask if the nation has any clear idea about how much groundwater is available in each hydrologic area. It is true that we have a fairly good idea about our surface water hydrology but a lot needs to be done about groundwater hydrology.

Finally, it is really a shame that we have to wait until JICA is ready to help us before we can build on what it did in 1995. Are we really an independent country?

Comments by DEPO ADENLE

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National water master plan captures development up to 2030

Published on Wednesday, 08 January 2014

Written by NAN

The National Water Resources Mater Plan review now at its final stage, captures water development plan and population growth up to  the year 2030.

Mr Kenneth Sumonu, an Assistant Director in the Department of Allocation and Authorisation, Federal Ministry of Water Resources, said this while speaking with the News Agency of Nigeria (NAN) on Monday in Abuja.

Sumonu, the Deputy Manager of the master plan project, said that every area in the country was captured in the master plan of its development agenda.

He added that the master plan would serve as a guide to the country’s development from 2013 to 2030, considering the nation’s population growth and water demand. While this sweeping statement sounds pleasing to the ear, one may ask if the Ministry of Water Resources have any idea about Nigeria’s population growth rate and water demand.

He noted that the country’s water resources were not properly harnessed, thereby necessitating implementation of the master plan for adequate utilisation of these resources.

“The final stage is so important because now, we can say we have a national water master plan that every sector can key into for their development agenda.

“It is very important that the master plan is a guide to ensuring sustainable development within our present demand and it’s from 2013 to 2030.

“Any development that has to do with water, you have to consult the master plan for availability of water. With respect to having to consult the master plan for how much water is available, one will like to ask if the nation has any clear idea about how much groundwater is available in each hydrologic area. It is true that we have a fairly good idea about our surface water hydrology but a lot needs to be done about groundwater hydrology.

“We have abundant water supply resources; we have huge potential even up to 2030; but they are not properly harnessed because water is not evenly distributed.’’

He said the weather data, meteorological data, hydrological data and population growth were the major areas captured in the plan.

Sumonu said the final copy of the document would be presented to the Ministry of Water Resources for full implementation on Jan. 20, 2014.

According to him, the master plan also made reference to Nigeria’s Vision 20:2020, National Water Road Map, MDGs and the Africa Water Vision in developing the plan.

He explained that the Japanese International Cooperation Agency (JICA), the organisation in charge of the review, developed the first master plan in 1995.

He said that the Federal Government subsequently requested the organisation to update the document for effective management of the country’s water resources.

The assistant director commended the organisation for the job, stating that the master plan was part of the support from the Japanese Government to Nigeria. (NAN)

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Improving Access to Potable Water: Bauchi and Sokoto States’ Efforts

Improving Access to Potable Water: Bauchi and Sokoto States’ Efforts

  1. BAUCHI

3000 Bauchi communities to get access to potable water

by Ahmed Mohammed, Sunday Trust, 23 December 2012.

Bauchi State Rural Water Supply and Sanitation Agency (RUWASSA) has expressed its commitment to providing access to safe water to 1.5 million people in 3,000 communities in Bauchi State.

General Manager of the Agency Engineer Garba Magaji, who spoke yesterday while briefing newsmen on the activities of the agency in Bauchi, said government had given adequate attention to access to safe water supply and sanitation in line with the millennium development goals and the National WASH Policy.

Engineer Magaji said government’s efforts to boost water supply in the rural areas led to the establishment of the agency with corresponding progressive annual increase in budgetary allocation.

He said government had approved a state WASH policy to guide programme implementation which, he added, had attracted international donors’ attention.

“The state is at present a beneficiary of two donors-supported projects in rural water supply and sanitation-a DIFD/UNICEF supported Sanitation Hygiene and Water in Nigeria (SHAWN) project being implemented in five local government areas since 2010 and the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) supported rural water supply project which is part of government of Japan’s grant aid programme to be implemented in 14 local government areas from January 2013,” Engineer Magaji, who hailed Bauchi State governor Isa Yuguda’s commitment to rural water supply said.

COMMENTS

While congratulating Bauchi State government in its efforts to improve access to potable water in the rural areas, one cannot but wonder what proportion of this initiative is borne by donors:  what fraction of the 3,000 communities is being covered by the donors and what fraction is the state’s.

It would also be of great interest to know what percentage of the government budget is devoted to rural water supply as most states in Nigeria proclaim their commitment to development, a program that must have access to water supply as a basic component.

Reference is made to what the State is doing with respect to Millennium Development Goals (MDG). It will also be interesting to know how much the State got for its MDG projects as well as the status of such MDG projects.

DEPO ADENLE

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  1. SOKOTO

Sokoto spends N200m on rural water

By Maiyaki Usman, Daily Times NG, December 14, 2012

Sokoto State Commissioner for Water Resources Alhaji Arzika Tureta, said on Thursday that the government had spent N200 million to upgrade various rural water schemes across the state.

Sokoto State Commissioner for Water Resources Alhaji Arzika Tureta, said on Thursday that the government had spent N200 million to upgrade various rural water schemes across the state.

Tureta said in Sokoto that the schemes were upgraded to semi urban water status to ensure clean and potable water to the people.

According to him, the benefiting communities included Bulanyaki, Bangi, Alasan, Jabo, Birni Ruwa, Gulumbawa, Gatawa, Hamma’ali Bunkari, Lukuyawa, Kurawa, Badau, Modachi, Bakale, Rafin Sanyi Kubutta and Kokota villages.

The Commissioner called on the communities to imbibe the culture of safeguarding government property against vandals, adding that government would continue to implement policies and programmes that would enhance the well being of the people through the provision of infrastructure across the state.

COMMENTS

Congratulations to the Sokoto State Government in its efforts to ensure that its rural population have access to potable water. However, one cannot but ask the following questions on the State’s  efforts:

  1. What are the sources of the water for the schemes that were upgraded?
  2. How many schemes were upgraded with N200 million?
  3. Does it mean that the schemes that were upgraded were supplying poor-quality water to the rural people because according to the State’s Commissioner for Water Resources the upgrading is supposed to bring these schemes “to semi urban status to ensure clean and potable water to the people.”?

It appears that Sokoto State Government did not involve the benefiting communities in its water supply efforts. If it did, it would have educated the communities about what would need to be done after the upgrading exercise, such as the need to safeguard the facilities rather than just drop a hint at the completion of the project.

Furthermore, it would have put in place institutions like  water consumers associations  that would have been given the responsibility for maintenance of the upgraded schemes.

DEPO ADENLE