Access to water through an ATM-style dispenser in Kenya: Is it possible in Nigeria?

One of the problems of Small Town and Rural Water Supply is how to collect effectively and efficiently revenue from communities for the services provided.

Sustainable rural and small town water supply depends to a large extent on the ability of Water Consumers Association, in the case of Small Town, and WASHCOM in case of rural water supply, to collect revenue for services rendered.

In the early part of 2005 this blogger was involved in a scoping study of community water supply management organized by WaterAid in Benue State. It was discovered that the facilities that were managed by WASHCOMS that collected revenues efficiently were running well compared with those that were the reverse was the case. Similar results have been observed in the European Union Water Supply and Sanitation Sector Reform Programme (WSSSRP) in Nigeria.

The success recorded in Kenya slum of Mathare using ATMs should be given a trial in Nigeria.

Comment: DEPO ADENLE.
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Kenya slum Mathare gets cheap water through ATMs

BBC Report, 22 June 2015
From the section Africa

Residents of the Mathare slum area of Kenya’s capital, Nairobi, are now able to access water through an ATM-style dispenser. People living in slums traditionally rely on vendors, who are expensive, or polluted sources to get drinking water. But the new system, where people use a smart card, is designed to provide cheaper and cleaner water.

The water company is opening four of these dispensers in Nairobi and there are hopes the scheme will be expanded. A version of the scheme has been used in rural areas in Kenya, but it is thought this is the first time that it will be used in an urban area.

Residents swipe the smart cards, topped up at a kiosk or through a mobile phone, at the dispenser and water starts flowing from the tap.

The Nairobi City Water and Sewerage company says it is charging half a Kenya shilling (half a US cent) for 20 litres of water. This is much cheaper than the rates being charged by the water vendors, reports the BBC’s Abdullahi Abdi in Nairobi.

The dispensers have been set up through a partnership between the local government and the Danish water engineering company Grundfos.

The company says that this public-private partnership model could be developed in other countries.

Meanwhile in another part of Nairobi residents are complaining about a water shortage.

The BBC’s Ahmed Adan in the suburb of Eastleigh says that vendors are selling water at 50 Kenya shillings for 20 litres – 100 times the price at the new water dispensing machines.

Having clean drinking water is one of the United Nations Millennium Development Goals and it is thought that worldwide more than 700 million people still do not have access to it.

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